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Welcome to Helicopters' Canadian Innovation in Rotary Safety Week

The Canadian helicopter industry is on the cutting edge of new processes, products and technologies that continue to enhance the safety envelope from coast-to-coast.

Over the next week, Helicopters magazine will showcase companies that are leading the charge in helping to ensure the operating space in this country is as safe as it can possibly be.

This special week is brought to you by Fort Erie, Ont.-based Airbus Helicopters Canada, part of Airbus, a global leader in aeronautics, space and related services.

This page serves as a hub for Canadian innovation in rotary safety. The page highlights news stories, features and more to showcase the leaders who are creating a safer operating environment.


Canadian Innovation in Rotary Safety Week
When pilots of the Airbus Helicopter AS350 train in the new HNZ Topflight simulator at the Alberta Aerospace Training Centre in Edmonton, they may literally come to “the end of their rope.”
Published in Procedures
Vector Aerospace has received Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) approval to extend its ADS-B solutions to cover the Airbus Helicopters H120/EC120, H125/AS350, H130/EC130 and H135/EC135 series, with operators able to choose from either the L3 Lynx NGT-9000 or Garmin GTX-345 transponders.
Published in Industry News
The DART Aerospace EC130 Heli-Utility-Basket has been the only external cargo expansion option of its type since arriving on the market in 2010. When Air Zermatt, world-renowned alpine search and rescue operator and longtime DART customer acquired a H130 (EC130T2), they purchased the DART basket. CEO and pilot with Air Zermatt Gerold Biner described this product as “an indispensable tool for our versatile operation”. Since the initial certification flight tests for the basket were conducted on an EC130B4, Air Zermatt quickly found that their H130 was capable of more with the basket installed.
Published in Innovations
Latitude Technologies has announced that the company has signed a three-year contract to provide flight data analytics services to Ornge for their fleet of Leonardo AW139 helicopters. Utilizing existing onboard SSQARs, Latitude will assist in developing an HFDM program whereby digital flight data generated during line operations is collected and analyzed to provide greater insight into the total flight operations environment. The information and insights provided by FDM can also be used to reduce operational costs and significantly enhance training effectiveness, operational procedures, maintenance and engineering procedures.
Published in Industry News
The Super Puma crash off the Norwegian coast in late April that killed 13 people is a sobering reminder that statistics seem to fade into irrelevance when the victim of an accident is your spouse, your parent, your friend.
Published in Procedures
It has been my experience that most helicopter operators approach their safety programs primarily from the perspective of flying operations and maintenance activities. Yet, the pure, health and safety – labour code aspect of our safety programs can sometimes be lacking. One facet of managing risks as part of a safety management system involves contractor safety. What can we do to address this area of risk management and workplace safety?
Published in Procedures
Eagle Copters has announced its Eagle 407HP, powered by the Honeywell HTS900 engine, received United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) supplemental type certificate (STC) approval for the company’s inlet barrier filter (IBF).
Published in Industry News
When it is deployed in early 2018 to the Transport Canada training centre in Ottawa, the new flight simulator for the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) Bell 412 EPI and Bell 429 helicopters may be the most technologically advanced non-military rotary-wing training system in the world.
Published in New Technologies
Safety. It’s the driving force behind every aspect of the helicopter industry, a delicate bond uniting operators, suppliers, clients and end users together on so many critical levels.
Published in Procedures
Should Canada increase the penalties for the hooligans and sociopaths who aim laser lights at aircraft? Under the Aeronautics Act, those convicted of pointing a laser at an aircraft could face up to $100,000 in fines, five years in prison, or both. By comparison, U.S. federal law allows up to 20 years in prison and a US$250,000 ($333,000) fine.
Published in Procedures
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