Procedures
Some of us are old enough to remember Paul Simon’s groove – 50 ways to leave your lover – but in this feature, I challenge you with some ideas gleaned from industry, with 15 ways to enhance your personal safety tools – for pilots, engineers, support staff and, yes, company managers.
At N 47°36’58,W052°45’10 lies Cougar Helicopters.
Does anyone want to work off-site anymore? I count myself in the group that loathes being gone too long these days.
The helicopter industry is in “survival mode,” according to some observers, buffeted by depressed oil prices and fatal accidents that have grounded key aircraft in the fleet. The natural expectation of tough economic times is that helicopter operators might shirk on safety measures and productivity could suffer as employees fear a redundancy notice.
Enhancing safety standards in the global helicopter industry is a process that is constantly evolving, as individual operators, OEMS and regulators strive to introduce new technologies and procedures to help prevent accidents and incidences throughout all levels of the business.
When pilots of the Airbus Helicopter AS350 train in the new HNZ Topflight simulator at the Alberta Aerospace Training Centre in Edmonton, they may literally come to “the end of their rope.”
The Super Puma crash off the Norwegian coast in late April that killed 13 people is a sobering reminder that statistics seem to fade into irrelevance when the victim of an accident is your spouse, your parent, your friend.
It has been my experience that most helicopter operators approach their safety programs primarily from the perspective of flying operations and maintenance activities. Yet, the pure, health and safety – labour code aspect of our safety programs can sometimes be lacking. One facet of managing risks as part of a safety management system involves contractor safety. What can we do to address this area of risk management and workplace safety?
Springtime in Vancouver means two things – cherry blossoms and the CHC Safety & Quality Summit. Helicopters had the opportunity to speak with Duncan Trapp, CHC Helicopter’s vice president of safety and quality about this year’s event.
Safety. It’s the driving force behind every aspect of the helicopter industry, a delicate bond uniting operators, suppliers, clients and end users together on so many critical levels.
Should Canada increase the penalties for the hooligans and sociopaths who aim laser lights at aircraft? Under the Aeronautics Act, those convicted of pointing a laser at an aircraft could face up to $100,000 in fines, five years in prison, or both. By comparison, U.S. federal law allows up to 20 years in prison and a US$250,000 ($333,000) fine.
One of my favourite dictums can be summed up as, “wrenches turn nuts and hammers drive nails.” I use it a lot because I see many instances where people are in the wrong positions for their aptitude or are handed tasks they are ill prepared for and someone else should be doing.
Earlier this fall, I had the distinct pleasure of visiting with Helicopter Association of Canada (HAC) president and CEO Fred Jones at the association’s new home in the nation’s capital. Jones is one of the people I respect most in the Canadian aviation and aerospace industry, as few people are more connected, committed and passionate about the success of their respective area of expertise – and the industry they work so hard to protect.
The more we do things, the easier they become and, more importantly, the more normal they seem. Pushing the limits has been something pilots have struggled with since 1903, and none are immune.
May 8, 2015, Oshawa, Ont. - It sounds like a problem out of a sci-fi movie, but Durham Regional Police are warning the public about the dangers of hitting their aircraft with laser beams.
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