Standards & Regulations
Minister of Transport Marc Garneau will soon be deciding whether the draft flight and duty time regulations that were published in Canada Gazette, Part I on July 1, 2017, should be brought into law this summer, and how much they should be modified in response to comments from industry stakeholders.  
The second annual All Canada Aeromedical Transport Safety conference took place Nov. 21 to 23 at the Ornge headquarters in Mississauga, Ont. The event entertained 56 attendees from 21 organizations – a nice uptick from the 37 attendees last year.
Why do some movies end happily, with the appropriate music playing as the credits roll, because only the pilot died? There are so many to choose from where the pilot is introduced, often becoming more than a peripheral character, yet departs early and often gruesomely.
Am I fit to fly? There has been a considerable volume of debate over the past five years or so about Transport Canada’s move towards harmonizing the Canadian regulatory framework with the rest of the world. But what does all this mean to those of us “at the coal face”? What can I and what must I do to stay safe?
For almost seven years, the Helicopter Association of Canada (HAC) and others industry associations have been consulting on the content of Transport Canada’s (TC’s) draft for new fatigue management regulations. And with the exception of input provided by the National Airline Association of Canada (NACC), the proposals and input made by HAC and the various associations have been largely ignored.
One of the themes of this issue is innovation, and for some time I struggled to start, since the rate of advancement in aviation is breathtaking and we risk being replaced by robots in the not too distant future. Then it occurred to me, that innovation isn’t about just technology, or methods, or brilliant marketing schemes – it also applies to policy and to the direction an industry may move.
This issue let’s talk about our maintenance brethren. Often unappreciated, the fact remains that without our AMEs, we would have nothing to fly and no work. So, let’s address the safety side of maintenance in our daily helicopter operations.
As Helicopters goes to press, the Canadian helicopter community is being led to believe that the draft Fatigue Management Regulations published in a Canada Gazette I Notice of Intent (NOI) on March 25 (www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2017/2017-03-25/html/notice-avis-eng.php) will be published for public consultation in Canada Gazette 1 by the end of June with very few changes.
Two years ago, in the wake of the mass murder/suicide of 150 passengers and crew on board Germanwings 7525, I wrote about the importance of looking out for our fellow pilots’ mental well being. I pleaded that the rush to regulate in the wake of the disaster not be done in haste, lest pilots with mental illness are driven underground, stop seeking help, and further put the travelling public at risk.  
Canada boasts one of the safest regulatory operating environments in the world but there is plenty of room for improvement – and changes are necessary to ensure it remains safe and secure in the months and years ahead.
Recreational drone users in Canada face new restrictions on where and when they can fly their remote-controlled devices, under new rules announced Thursday by Transportation Minister Marc Garneau.
Transport Canada’s (TC) fatigue management proposal still has many warts. TC has claimed that the proposed new regulations are “based on science.” The Helicopter Association of Canada (HAC) would argue that there is more science fiction than fact in the current draft.
I hate to disappoint those of you that thought this issue would go away with the Federal Election last year, but its back – and with a vengeance. No one wants a fatigued pilot. No one wants to be a fatigued pilot, but there are some serious problems with Transport Canada’s (TC) latest draft proposal.
Recently, Transport Canada (TC) released an update on the Flight Crew Fatigue Management issue. The thrust of the note was to inform the regulated community that TC intends to proceed directly to Canada Gazette I with new draft regulations in the spring of 2017.
We are on the way to winter now, but it was a long, hot summer out west, and it is looking more and more like this is the new normal – whatever “normal” is supposed to be. Looking at the planet as a whole, July 2015 was the warmest month since records were first kept back in the 1880s. The ideal for most is long, dry and hot summers following on the heels of milder winters with decreased precipitation – this is what we seem to want this new normal to be.
Page 1 of 8

Subscription Centre

 
New Subscription
 
Already a Subscriber
 
Customer Service
 
View Digital Magazine Renew

Most Popular